Marianne Emery

Marianne Emery is a Ph.D. candidate in Ruthie Angelovici’s Lab in Bond LSC. | photo by Allison Scott, Bond LSC

“#IAmScience because it leads to innovation that makes for a better world, which is an awesome thing to be a part of.”

It’s good to have a role model, and Marianne Emery has always looked up to female pioneer scientists.

One of her favorites is Barbara McClintock, a Nobel prize winning botantist who studied how the chromosomes of corn change during reproduction.

It is from women like McClintock that Emery is encouraged to always be impactful with her research and overcome obstacles with grace.

“I think it’s inspiring to see these women in positions that have typically been male-dominated,” Emery said. “You lose your confidence sometimes when things just don’t work. You’re continuously met with obstacles, but you have to keep going.”

And that she has.

Emery works in Ruthie Angelovici’s lab at Bond LSC to understand what controls protein levels in seed. She primarily spends her time on the computer working with large data sets and trying new software, but is always excited about the findings she’s able to uncover.

“I enjoy developing new skill sets every day,” Emery said. “The most important thing I’ve learned so far is how to communicate my science and how to communicate when I’m having an issue. Conveying a problem and problem-solving in general can be hard.”

Still, Emery continues to focus on improving on a daily basis. She hopes to work for a company like Monsanto after earning her Ph.D.

“I really like the business side of science,” Emery said. “Ultimately, a bigger company would be the best fit. I also really like policy and the patenting process.”

Wherever Emery ends up, though, she hopes to become like the women who pioneered science.

“Female scientists have been so inspiring to me,” Emery said. “I hope that one day I can be a leader and a role model for other young women who aspire to be involved with science.”